Tongue Pressure for Concentration Meditation

I went back to directive meditation yesterday for a while because I just wanted to experience an absolutely mind-blowing state. Nothing wrong with that.

Nondirective meditation has boosted my directive meditation skill enormously. It’s something to do with having to use fewer mental cycles to become concentrated, as a result of having learned to let go more. I recommend trying DM after several weeks of NDM, using any concentration object, to see if your skill level has increased. I suspect everyone will find that theirs has to some degree.

Anyway, one thing I noticed that I do during DM which I don’t think I’ve mentioned in any guides – but which is very important – is what to do with your tongue during meditation. You should press your tongue up into your palate so that the tip curls back slightly (into a backwards roll); this way, the “stalk” or “trunk” of the tongue is the bit actually making contact with and pushing up into the palate, and the tip is somewhat curled backwards.

I have marked with a red circle on the below diagram the spot where you should press your tongue. It is a kind of bony little divot (but don’t worry about getting it perfect – your tongue tends to find where it “wants” to be after some time). I have shown the diagram both with and without the circle:

You should continue pressing the tongue upward into this spot. After a while this becomes automatic and you don’t have to think about it. I believe it’s how you’re actually supposed to close your mouth.

This tongue position has many benefits for posture, including lots and lots of strong, noticeable myofascial release from the nerves in the throat, neck and face. This permanently loosens your limbs and, in fact, all areas of your body, since all myofascial meridians cross at the tongue/throat/jaw complex (hence the actual reason for yawning, which is the release of these “lines”).

This tongue position also creates a very strong upward energy current which your concentration can piggyback on and use to become more focused.

What I have noticed is that, eventually, the tongue settles into a very specific shape which it “wants” to be in, and stays there completely of its own accord during the whole meditation. Try to notice when it does this. It is an autopilot reflex that eventually kicks in, and is very stabilizing for the mind.

For my “meditation object” I actually just used the dark stuff behind my eyes using the “eye rest location” from CMR. This is in fact exactly how I used to meditate in the very early days, when I first started getting jhanas before I knew what they were, and before I got into Buddhism and became sidetracked with breath objects etc. So, this is my “natural” or “instinctive” method.

With the additional energy flow from the tongue, this meditation quickly developed a very strong central “I”-feeling. So, it felt like I was very strongly present in the meditation as a “central doer”.

Now, with my tongue pressed into the roof of my mouth, and my eyes finding where they wanted to be, I simply waited. I did nothing more with my mind. I did not try to stick to any object like glue, and did not “try” to become more concentrated. I also did not try to suppress verbal thoughts or anything like that. It was literally a matter of setting up the tongue and eye positions then just waiting. The nimitta appeared very quickly, connected to the central I-feeling, meaning the stronger that feeling became, the brighter the light also became. Very fast REM began to happen. Soon there was a strong feeling of “letting go”, like some grip of ownership over my body was released, and my mind let go of most of my perception of having a body. The first jhana came on strongly, and progressed classically to third. I did not “do” anything else besides the initial setup. I did not attempt to become more concentrated or do anything special with my mind. I just let it happen, which is what it “wants” to do anyway.

I ended up staying in the third jhana for around four hours. Because I have started experiencing time dilation during meditation (which is awesome and far preferable to the more common time contraction) this felt more like two days. That’s not much of an exaggeration. I would naturally come out of jhana every hour or so. I would check the time and be blown away that only an hour had passed when it felt more like the kind of refreshment a full eight hours of quality sleep would bring. If I closed my eyes and repeated the setup then I would slip back into jhana almost immediately, and climb quickly to third, at which point another hour would pass effortlessly. I was completely conscious, lucid and aware for the entire session.

The third jhana is probably the deepest sense of all-pervading happiness within a human’s reach (in terms of an “acute altered state”). Neurochemically, it is linked to a massive opioid/endorphin release in the brain, having matured from the more dopamine-based first and second jhana (though those states also have a heavy opioid contribution). On this occasion my jhana was laden with visual imagery, mostly revolving around images of my childhood home and deep feelings of safety and love, and the replaying of childhood memories that I am fairly sure never happened. I attribute the prevalence of dreamlike images to my lack of a more solid meditation object in this session. For example, if I use an energy current as my object, the third jhana will tend to feature a persistent tunnel of purple and gold light (this is just my personal experience; yours may vary!). When using the breath as the object, the breath will become extremely loud (a perceptual hallucination or emphasis), like I am breathing through scuba gear, and I could count a million breaths if I wanted to because the object dominates the sense field so much. Since I did not use a specific object in this session, the mind appeared to default to a more dreamlike mode.

I did not enter the equanimous fourth jhana (which is the absence of both good and bad feelings, for a total emotional flatline and acceptance of reality exactly as it is) – but I confess I made no attempt to do so. I figured my mind knew what was best for me and it decided to stay in third for almost the entire four hours. It probably did not want to let go of the happiness, which it must do in order to enter the fourth jhana, and which it often finds quite difficult to do because the happiness is so compelling.

After I came out of all this, I felt totally “full” inside, like I was just completely filled up with good feelings. It was similar to how you feel after your partner looks at you with warm, deep eye contact and sincerely tells you he or she loves you. I also felt absolutely as high as a fucking kite. It was like I could barely think. Words were coming out of my mouth but it seemed like they were on autopilot. I don’t remember much “planning” or thinking words in advance before saying them. I’m fairly sure I was talking verbal diarrhoea for most of the night. A friend came over because we were going up the road to do the pub quiz and he brought me a can of cider. I remember feeling completely wasted after just a few sips. Jhana eradicates the need for substances and makes them feel ten times stronger if they are used.

I had also forgotten to have dinner because jhana does a pretty good job of suppressing appetite. I therefore ordered some food at the pub, which was a burger with a pulled pork topping and onion rings inside. I remember just thinking, “This is so fucking good. It tastes so fucking good.” I had to keep saying it to myself, because I could barely believe how good it was. Jhana boosts taste perception and appreciation for all things a hundredfold. It can be quite an insane state, frankly. It will probably be nothing like what you imagine it to be. All ill-will towards other humans and all existential anxiety had evaporated and walking around the pub was like being in someone else’s dream. I would describe it as “disconnected”, except there’s nothing – No Self – that is disconnected from anything else. So, in fact, it feels very “whole”; there’s just not a whole lot of “Self” in the mix to experience the scene. Again, it’s more like being in a dream than anything else.

The night was on such autopilot, and I was having such an amazing time, that I ended up in some horrendous nightclub at five in the morning, dancing (!). And I don’t dance. And I don’t like nightclubs. But I loved this one. I kept asking myself, in regard to me and my friends being at this club, “Why are we here?” – and the only answer I got back was, “Because we love it.” And that was completely convincing for me at the time and made it even better. “Because we love it.” There was no other analysis required. A state of almost zombie-like happiness.

Now, because this was such a blatantly altered state of awareness to be in, with its own traits of hedonism and impulsivity, I have to ask myself whether it is actually desirable to recreate it, going forward. There are plenty of downsides, not the least of which was staying out drinking till six in the morning. My inclination is therefore towards continuing with nondirective meditation, which tends to induce far more equanimous states as its main “mode”, and to save third jhana antics like the above for birthdays, holidays, and other special occasions and one-offs. I also foresee myself giving up alcohol completely this year, since its downsides are becoming increasingly apparent (though I do not feel the kind of guilt for such compulsions that many people use to berate themselves).

In any case, it’s pretty damn nice to have the choice over which mental states I will experience on any given day. Meditation is, simply put, the single greatest endeavour you can make in your lifetime.

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32 Responses

  1. Kevin says:

    Hey Illuminatus,

    Your blog (and your older posts on mASF) have been life changing for me. Thank you!

    Do you still recommend your Basic Mindfulness Meditation for a beginner? Is it considered a Non-directive meditation? I’ve been an on off meditator for a number of years, but now I’m serious about making it a daily habit after realizing the tremendous sense of equanimity, flow and wu-wei during the times I’ve meditated in the past.

    Regards,
    Kevin

    • Illuminatus says:

      Hi Kevin,

      Glad to know I’m making a difference!

      >Do you still recommend your Basic Mindfulness Meditation for a beginner?

      I’m inclined towards giving CMR to all beginners. The feedback has been universally positive for it.

      >Is it considered a Non-directive meditation?

      The Basic Mindfulness Meditation uses the breath as an object, so it is directive. Nondirective meditations don’t use objects.

      Read this comment for more on the differences between the two: http://www.personalpowermeditation.com/nondirective-meditation-the-only-show-in-town/#comment-107544

      • Kevin says:

        By CMR you are referring to the meditation explained here, right? http://www.personalpowermeditation.com/forum2/nondirective-meditation-self-inquiry/conscious-mental-rest-(cmr)/

        I used to focus on an external object like a point in space when I used to meditate in the past. Then I basically forced myself not to have thoughts. Awareness of breath never really worked for me. I felt as if I’m becoming too controlling of my breath and not letting the natural rhythm take over. This made me wonder whether I can’t observe something without feeling the need to control it.

        • Illuminatus says:

          Yes that is CMR.

          What you just described is the basic problem with using the breath. The solution is to use a specific breathing pattern, which is similar to the one that engages when you are falling asleep. It’s probably fairly difficult to teach, though. Breathing pattern makes all the difference, though.

          But you avoid all this hassle by simply not bothering with breath meditation. You don’t need it. Switch to CMR and see how you find that instead.

  2. Kautilya says:

    This is the beginning of Kechari Mudra – some yogis will eventually cause their tongue to roll back INTO the nasal cavity at which point Amrit (ambrosial nectar – some say induces a kind of DMT release due to close proximity with the pineal gland) gets released.

    Not safe! to do without instruction but what you mentioned here is absolutey perfect for someone just learning by themselves.

    I’m doing a few different meditations now and allow myself to ‘let go’ into ‘new’ ones during the meditation.

    Thanks man! I’m not an ex-member of the Concentration Crew just yet lol

    • Illuminatus says:

      To me it’s fairly obvious from practice that my tongue curl in this post does cause energy to pass into the pineal, so it can be considered a very mild form of kechari mudra. However, I am not instructing anyone to go any further with that.

      BTW the pineal activation may account for the dreamlike state I experienced in the meditation. I was certainly NOT asleep, however.
      As soon as the tongue position “clicked” into autopilot mode like I described in the post an altered state was brought on immediately.
      A very equanimous state can be attained extremely quickly by using the energy flowing up through the base of the tongue as the object.

      Looking forward to feedback on this one, especially from total beginners. I might be on my way to fulfilling one of my goals, which is the “one-session jhana” (a guide so effective that anyone can use it to attain jhana on the first attempt). That would be a precursor to my second goal, the “one-week enlightenment”. 🙂

      • Arpan says:

        “a guide so effective that anyone can use it to attain jhana on the first attempt”

        Don’t you think that results in meditation are too heavily premised on “soft factors” like attitude/emotional-feel/ingrained-habits of each individual, to ensure consistent results for everyone in same time frame, much less 1st session. That’s what makes dealing with humans more complex than robots where you can just design that perfect algorith for every robot of that type.

        • Illuminatus says:

          I see no reason not to have it as a background project that gets bits added to it from time to time. If it doesn’t work, it doesn’t work!

          • Kautilya says:

            What about ‘One Day Samadhi’…..or by that I kinda mean ‘One Hour Satori’

            Light absorption states that leave room for ‘regular’ daily living. Or is this that ‘god mode’ thing? Elongated Flow state? Limitless?

            Another ‘tech’ for you and Arpan is your natural breath being switched you 6-6 Ujjaiyi Breath. Ujjaiyi Breath, through the throat, 6 seconds in – 6 seconds out – meant to the optimum Breath length between activation of sympathetic and parasympathetic system.

            I think however that the effects are VERY powerful and will differ and perhaps only be able to be felt at its full potential by persons who can readily access Jhana or No-Mind or other such meditative states will relative ease.

  3. Gautam says:

    I’m still not totally clear on how CMR is non-directive — when I read the instructions, it sounds like it’s just concentration meditation where the object is the act of holding the eyes in the right place. Am I missing something major?

    • Illuminatus says:

      Nondirective—Directive is a SPECTRUM.

      A summary could be:
      “The more control one attempts to exert over the outcome of the meditation, the more DIRECTIVE it is said to be.”

      If we make it a 0–1 scale with nondirective as zero and directive as one, then:

      – Shinzen Young’s “Do Nothing” meditation (YouTube it) would fall close to 0 (zero). Intention to control the meditation is dropped entirely.
      – Breath meditation with tight concentration on the breath at all times would be close to 1 (one).

      With this in mind, CMR would come in at around a 0.3 rating.
      The thing that affects how “nondirective” CMR is, is how strongly one keeps one’s eyes in the “Attention Comfort Zone”. Paradoxically however, forcing one’s eyes to stay here actually increases tension. So the meditation has some built-in feedback that keeps it fairly nondirective.

      While I have explained this quite well, there is no substitute for trying them yourself. Practise one week straight “Do Nothing”, then another week CMR. Finally, do a couple of days of straight directive, e.g. staying with the sensations of air at the centre of the nose. You should by then have quite a clear idea of what is and what isn’t nondirective meditation.

      Finally, I will also add that one thing that makes a meditation “directive” (at least in my mind) is the intention for jhana. So, even though I was essentially practising CMR in the above post, I had a strong intention for an altered state to arise. This intention is not present at all when I practise “true” nondirective meditation. That, for me, is quite a key difference.

      • Arpan says:

        How do you intend a jhana ?
        Do you keep some memory-sense of how it felt when you had it in past ? (Taking this from how we intend for anything: keep a Feel of how it would be if you attained it)

        • Illuminatus says:

          Honestly I have become of the opinion recently that you don’t even need a “sense memory” of something to intend it into existence. For me now, just deciding I want a jhana at the start of the session means I will go straight for it. The mind is like a juggernaut; it just ploughs the path straight to jhana and any thought that arises is taken as being a passive part of that process. I suppress nothing; I hold nothing in mind; I just wait.

          • Arpan says:

            Okay so you basically practiced pure CMR in the session you mentioned in this post. The only difference being you clearly decided you want to experience a jhana before you started the session. Right ?

            • Illuminatus says:

              Yes. Additionally, CMR produces the I-feeling so strongly in me that CMR and I-feeling are now one and the same. So the act of simply looking forward with closed eyes gathers together such a strong central presence that energy begins rising immediately and the nimitta develops extremely rapidly and brightly.

              This has been the case for over a year now. However, this rapidly growing energy used to give me immediate jaw tightness and pain (extreme in some cases) which I’ve written about many times before. However, the tongue alignment I wrote about in this post now completely deals with that, and my tightness itself has been alleviated almost totally over the last few months by straight NDM (with “What Is” seeming still to be the best).

              The only difference between pure CMR and what I used to do as described here (http://www.personalpowermeditation.com/how-i-discovered-access-concentration-and-jhana/) is that in those days I believed I had to hold the eyes steady and suppress thoughts arising at the periphery in order to enter the altered state. I now realize however that this is not necessary; simply looking forward with good alignment of tongue and spine will propel me into the high-energy altered state regardless of the thoughts that arise during the process.

              I believe that one of the main hindrances beginners face is in fact that energy can rise quickly in meditation, especially with good alignment. If they don’t know what to do with that energy, it turns into turbulent thought patterns. I think much of the battle is in learning to simply leave the path clear so the energy can develop. We as a species seem to be operating on something like only 15% of our mental energy capacity. It seems we are intentionally kept in a low energy state by social conditioning. Rises above that default position tend to be viewed as mental illness.

              • Arpan says:

                “this is not necessary; simply looking forward with good alignment of tongue and spine will propel me into the high-energy altered state regardless of the thoughts that arise during the process.”
                I feel that years of practice have developed your basic mental schema in the direction of harnessing this stuff quickly and if you used straightaway used NDM 10 years ago(with no one to tell you that it surely works) you might have thought you are wasting your time in quit this method. In traditional Eastern homes(especially Indian) when one is taught meditation, some. element of devotion /reverence/surrender/humility is taught first(my dad still berates me if I am reactive/irritable towards everyday stuff as it denotes “weakness”). This leads to “softening” of the I-feeling/ego which in you must have learnt in meditative bliss. Thus, we tend to be more inclined to be patient towards NDM.

                ” We as a species seem to be operating on something like only 15% of our mental energy capacity. It seems we are intentionally kept in a low energy state by social conditioning. Rises above that default position tend to be viewed as mental illness.”
                It Can easily lead to mental issues. Eg. 3rd eye awakening without proper emotional development can be exciting but very debilitating. My dad has extremely sharp insight into people and circumstances via intuitive flashes but he has comparitively low emotional acceptance(warrior attitude). This often brings misery.
                Infact, very few people can constantly live in clear light of truth about everybody and everything around them, as well as a good ability to predict stuff.

                • Gautam says:

                  This comment says something that I’ve been thinking for a while now — everyone who has great results with NDM seems to have had a lot of experience with DM first. I’m a little skeptical of recommending NDM to total beginners because it really isn’t that different from normal life — most people don’t have a strong sense of how it “feels” to have an intention, for example. (I know that intention is “before” feeling and the feeling isn’t the main thing — but I think you know what I mean — it’s not something you can put into words.) So someone with no experience doing what you did, intending to experience jhana and then just doing CMR, I don’t think would have any remarkable results.

                  This is my experience, anyway — people who have done a lot of, for example, samatha jhana and then switch to NDM have amazing results and say “Just do NDM, it’s great!”, and people who just start doing NDM think they’re having amazing experiences when really they’re just sitting there getting increasingly lost in the mind-stuff.

                  Is there any truth in this? I also did a lot of concentration before I started trying things like “do nothing” and CMR so I’m not in a great position to say.

                    • Gautam says:

                      That is a great answer, thank you.

                      One more question — my experience of NDM is that the pleasure and joy have a very different “flavour” than jhana. But it’s more mellow, more relaxed. Is that your experience, too?

                    • Arpan says:

                      @ Gautam:
                      This extract seems to tally my experience:

                      ” There is a definite difference in how these two types of meditation “feel”. The closest analogy I can think of is apple juice (mindfulness) compared to pineapple juice (nondirective). They are both juice, so they’re definitely similar. But they also taste quite different.

                      Mindfulness bliss is thinner, like apple juice, and more likely to be washed away. Nondirective bliss is heavier, like pineapple juice, and seems more likely to stay around.There is a definite difference in how these two types of meditation “feel”. The closest analogy I can think of is apple juice (mindfulness) compared to pineapple juice (nondirective). They are both juice, so they’re definitely similar. But they also taste quite different.

                      Mindfulness bliss is thinner, like apple juice, and more likely to be washed away. Nondirective bliss is heavier, like pineapple juice, and seems more likely to stay around.”
                      Source:
                      https://www.google.co.in/amp/s/amp.reddit.com/r/nondirective/comments/2dslpv/reflecting_on_18_years_of_mindfulness_versus_a/

                    • Illuminatus says:

                      >One more question — my experience of NDM is that the pleasure and joy have a very different “flavour” than jhana. But it’s more mellow, more relaxed. Is that your experience, too?

                      I think they are very different. NDM joy feels more “natural”. Jhana/DM pleasure on the other hand is quite a blatant altered state which, while not exactly “druggy”, is far harder and more tangible. It feels like an obvious manipulation has been made to the central nervous system.

                    • Illuminatus says:

                      I will also mention the addictive potential of DM jhana which is simply not there with NDM. So, in this post, if my friend had not come over, I surely would have stayed in the third jhana for several more hours.

                      I wrote up a few times my experience at the end of last year where I hacked together lucid dreaming in the jhana state, giving crystal clear bliss-filled beach scenes with new lifeforms to discover and warm seas to swim in. I would have stayed in those scenes for hours longer every day were it not for the fact I had to go to work.

                      The compulsion toward such states is basically the same as attachment to drug states etc. That attachment is not a feature of NDM however.

                  • Illuminatus says:

                    My feedback on this website so far indicates beginners are responding well to NDM quite quickly.
                    So, on the forum, one guy tried it for a couple of days and felt it wasn’t doing anything. I told him to stick with it and just assume it’s working. A week later he’s singing its praises because things in his life are calming down, slotting into place etc. That’s been a common theme since I started talking about it.

                    With DM however, because the goals are so overt (e.g. “Get access concentration, get jhana” etc.) people can become frustrated very quickly. That doesn’t seem to be happening with NDM; they are taking things as they come.

                    >everyone who has great results with NDM seems to have had a lot of experience with DM first

                    One reason for this is that, when I first started meditating, all the materials commonly available were DM. It’s only recently I’ve seen interest in NDM. So people did DM first because that’s what was out there.

                    >I’m a little skeptical of recommending NDM to total beginners because it really isn’t that different from normal life

                    I disagree. The intention to meditate alone sets it apart from normal life. I talked more about this here: http://www.personalpowermeditation.com/nondirective-meditation-the-only-show-in-town/#comment-107550

                    >So someone with no experience doing what you did, intending to experience jhana and then just doing CMR, I don’t think would have any remarkable results.

                    Reading around the NDM Reddit, I noticed a few people who got jhana just from NDM without knowing it would happen. Their stories were similar to my early days meditations. It seems some people are just inclined towards falling into these states, for whatever reason. I think to some degree it doesn’t even matter what type of meditation you give to such people; provided they are sat still with their eyes closed they will fall into jhana at some point.

                    >and people who just start doing NDM think they’re having amazing experiences when really they’re just sitting there getting increasingly lost in the mind-stuff.

                    Well I don’t much understand the distinction between “thinking they are having amazing experiences” and “actually have amazing experiences”. If you feel very happy when you meditate and ordinarily you wouldn’t, then that is an amazing experience. If it persists even when you’re not meditating, even better!

                    Ultimately I think most of the change from meditation is unconscious/invisible and NDM provides a way for people to begin that process without much resistance, specifically BECAUSE the meditation mode is not that different from what they do anyway in normal life. (Yet, the intention itself, to sit and meditate and change from within, is what drives it IMO, and that is what is NOT present in normal life for most people.)

                    • Kautilya says:

                      I think pretty much similar stuff was said about non-concentration styles when that was in faux here.

                      If you changed the meditation style here to ‘feeling energy at the toes’ because

                      – extremities
                      – linked to sexual region in the brain
                      – grounding energy

                      And a whole host of other reasons, some people would still find it works – ANY meditation works.

                      Buddha also recommended a concentrated mind, as did Vivekananda and other yogis and those reasons are good too.

                      What’s in no doubt is that if you are past the Jhana Holy Grail you have a superb platform for any meditation. ‘Do Nothing’ is very simple and does not need to much analysis and this NDM I think is best described by Adyashanti.

                      That being said, the delicate way NDM is being put here has a really good feel about it and I’m not doubting it’s effectiveness in fact I do it at night.

                      But, If you are a person who has a very creative, overactive mind and you tell them to go straight into NDM and let the mind do what it wants it will only feed the restlessness. Maybe some people are more inclined towards the quiet, but many people will need some experience with a still focused mind at least for a while. Otherwise you will unknowingly feed that beast even more and no it will not just settle down.

                      Bruce Lee was right with martial arts and most other things – and that’s physical fighting forms.

                      No way pure DM or NDM is right for every beginner. If anything it’s this mantra-release-silence kind of thing.

                      There are also other totally different approaches to meditation that do not fit neatly into these categories and good arguements about why they are best suited to the new meditator of modern man.

                    • Betha says:

                      @ Kautilya

                      “Otherwise you will unknowingly feed that beast even more and no it will not just settle down.”

                      The beast doesn’t need to settle down, if you become unattached to it. At least, that has been my experience so far.

                      I started out with “Do Nothing” when I had almost no experience at all with meditation. Now I have been meditating consistently for a few months. Half of the time I spend my head in the clouds and conjure up “what if” scenarios, but I am not bothered by it. Sometimes the awareness returns from the midst of all the chaos and sometimes it doesn’t, but I’ve still got faith in the process that takes place behind the scenes of my mental machinations. The restless mind isn’t a problem unless I turn it into one.

                      Whatever my mind does or doesn’t do, I can’t really fail with “Do Nothing” provided that I am physically still when sitting on the cushion.

    • Arpan says:

      There is no instruction in CMR to “hold” the eyes at the right place.

  4. Molo says:

    Placing your tongue on the roof of your mouth pushes your maxilla forward(resulting in more attractive features) and straightens teeth. Kids need to get braces because their faces are not properly formed due to improper tongue placement and mouth breathing not allowing their jaws and face to form properly. Placing your tongue on the roof of your mouth prevents and can fix a retruding maxilla.

    When you leave your tongue at the bottom of your mouth, your face “caves in” because there is a bunch of empty space and your jaw weakens. Having your tongue on the bottom of your mouth is terrible for your posture because it pushes down your head. To stop this, swallow with your tongue placed on the roof of your mouth and hold your tongue on the roof of your mouth. This will fix your posture since having your tongue on the roof of your mouth pushes your head up and forward instead of letting it hang down. A good way to find the proper tongue placement for yourself is the cheesy smile method, make a big smile and raise your eyebrows, where your tongue goes is where it’s supposed to be.

    http://www.buteykochildren.com/mouth_breathing_and_facial_development.php

    You’re definitely right that this is the proper way to close your face, some orthodontics like Mike Mew have been advocating this position for a while now. Orthodontists in general are overplaying the genetics part of this and most people can fix their crooked teeth/misaligned maxilla(children-> young adults will have the most effective treatment)

  5. FirstTimeCommenter says:

    Very cool stuff 🙂

    I indirectly asked this question already below your Removing-Phobias-article, so sorry for the redundancy: I am a bit confused, if you would also recommend this technique for NDM, since you talk about NDMs in the comment section and you write “Anyway, one thing I noticed that I do during DM which I don’t think I’ve mentioned in any guides – but which is very important – is what to do with your tongue during meditation.”

    “during meditation” in the sense of “during meditation in general, i.e. during DM and NDM alike”? From the title alone, however, I would have guessed, you are only refereeing to DM.
    I really don’t want to be pedantic and cunty about this, I just would like to know, if I am doing something unproductive/unhelpful, when combing this tongue-technique and NDM 😉

    As I also mentioned in my comment below your Removing-Phobias-article, I am since last week using this technique for the Soft Mantra NDM and felt it had good effects (better concentration, less restless mind, better mood, felt more energetic). So I now feel like sticking with it.

    „I believe it’s how you’re actually supposed to close your mouth.“ So you would actually recommend this as default tongue-position whilst one’s mouth is closed?

    I have made good experiences doing this during my household chores and whilst in the gym during the last couple of days. Very mind- and mood-stabilizing. Very energising (I’m usually on the fatigue end of things). Good for my confidence, too. Slavering is a bit of a problem, but really not much.

    I also was able to quickly get rid of my back pain yesterday, which I suffered from because I was sitting in an unnatural way for an hour in front of my PC without really noticing/caring via this tongue technique. (I was …uhm..distracted by the …uhm.. movies of ..uhm.. high creative value I was watching 😉 It really improves posture a 1000 times!

    If I would now close my mouth in this fashion as default, wouldn’t it take away the kind of connection/circuit “tongue-technique -> meditation -> heightened awareness/energy state”?

    Furthermore, since you stated: “To me it’s fairly obvious from practice that my tongue curl in this post does cause energy to pass into the pineal, so it can be considered a very mild form of kechari mudra” I am wondering, if doing this for basically 16 h/per day wouldn’t be too much. If not, I would gladly give it a try. I was just wondering like two weeks ago, if I should work on my pineal gland/third eye 🙂

  6. Illuminatus says:

    > I am a bit confused, if you would also recommend this technique for NDM

    One of the effects of the tongue-press is to suppress verbal thought. In NDM you do not suppress verbal thought, and I do not do the tongue-press. Eventually however you may find the tongue just settles into that spot in your mouth by itself during NDM, which of course is fine. It is its natural resting place. When it settles there naturally though it is more of a “soft contact” than an actual press.

    If I were to rewrite this article for beginners I would say just make contact with the roof of the mouth immediately behind the front two teeth during DM.

    • FirstTimeCommenter says:

      Thanks, Edd!
      I actually never pressed that hard to begin with; it was more of a “soft contact” (or at least a softer contact) in fact. I should have made this clear in my initial comment.

      Since I don’t want to fuck up my NDM practice, I will now stop doing this during NDM and just let my tongue and mouth end up in whatever position they prefer during NDM. Let’s see what happens.

      However, since this soft contact thingy just feels so natural, calming, yet energising and up-lifting (and has such a good effect on my posture) I think I will engage in it off the mediation cushion for 1 – 2 h a day (e.g. whilst working at the PC, doing household chores, talking a walk through the park and maybe even whilst going out). I just hope both plans are compatible.

      • Illuminatus says:

        It just suggests to me that verbal thought was moving your tongue away from its resting place, and now you’ve found it again, you’re happier. It’s like pulling a thorn out of your foot. Much of meditation is just undoing mistakes made by the modern world.

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