Basic Anxiety

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15 Responses

  1. Rigz says:

    One thing that puzzles me, is if the western world is so schizo and left brain dominated, how did deep profundities arising from right brain awareness enter the common language as folk wisdom? I imagine the amount of people that have had the insight into fascia and its relation to emotions and the muscles is almost next to none. Yet “comfortable in his own skin” is a common phrase. The simple word “heartwearming”, do you think most people just use this word because they understand it contextually, or because they are describing actual feelings of warmth in their heart? It is extremely strange that these profound words and phrases are out there in plain view yet everyone seems to use them based on mere context alone.

    • Illuminatus says:

      I don’t know the answers to any of those questions, but we can break it down and make some guesses:

      “One thing that puzzles me, is if the western world is so schizo and left brain dominated, how did deep profundities arising from right brain awareness enter the common language as folk wisdom?”

      A term I inferred from The Master and His Emissary is “left-brain drift” — the process of becoming more left-brain dominant on both the individual and societal levels as time passes. I can’t remember if McGilchrist ever used that phrase exactly, but that’s what I use for it. Robert Anton Wilson predicted its meteoric rise as technology grew more advanced.

      Left-brain drift, like seemingly all things human-related, seems to pick up pace logarithmically. So, it gets worse, faster as time goes by. We might be seeing a pinnacle of left-brain drift right now with humans glued to smartphones — literally behaving like a giant intraconnected left brain. Or maybe it can get worse — who knows. Remember, the more intraconnected the left brain (connected within itself), the less awareness it has of things outside itself. This is how, in people’s minds, liking a Facebook status (say, in opposition to some government action) can equate with actual action “out there”. So, in the past, perhaps folk wisdom was more readily available as the right brain was not yet suppressed to the same degree it is today.

      ” I imagine the amount of people that have had the insight into fascia and its relation to emotions and the muscles is almost next to none. Yet “comfortable in his own skin” is a common phrase. The simple word “heartwearming”, do you think most people just use this word because they understand it contextually, or because they are describing actual feelings of warmth in their heart?”

      I would guess that most people use most such phrases simply contextually, these days. I know I did before really getting into this body work stuff. “Heart-warming” however could feasibly generate enough awareness of warmth in the chest that people occasionally use it in a more genuine way.

      However, I can’t remember if this is in his book, but I seem to remember it from one of his seminars I found on YouTube, where McGilchrist refers to the following phenomenon: Someone has had a left-brain stroke and can therefore no longer speak. At some point he gets so exasperated trying to speak that he suddenly blurts out, “Why can’t I say the fucking word!!” So, based on that, and other evidence such as singing for the brain (singing therapy for stroke victims to help teach the right brain to speak via the mode it likes — music), the right brain can communicate via words provided it is approached in the way it “likes” (emotions, music, etc.) This ties into my holographic brain theory, which I haven’t published yet, but which I might write up soon because it’s quite fun and explains a lot.

      “It is extremely strange that these profound words and phrases are out there in plain view yet everyone seems to use them based on mere context alone.”

      Yes. So much of the human condition is embedded in everyday language and phrases that are taken for granted. A major point McGilchrist gets across in The Master and His Emissary is that all language originated with the body. So, if you consider phrases associated with learning, such as “to grasp something”, that is describing the function of Broca’s area, which deals with both language comprehension AND physical action recognition and reproduction (i.e. literally grabbing something, usually with the right hand). All words would initially have been this simple, and related directly to body sensations and functions.

      If anyone is interested in buying that book, here is the link: The Master and His Emissary

      Another interesting (and completely non-PC) area of this innate “body language” relates to words people use to describe others’ facial features and body forms. For example, “beady eyes” could relate to small, narrow-set eyes, which are associated with egocentric and dishonest behaviours in forms of phrenology going back to time immemorial, and much of which Koanic has resurrected and added to in his own studies: http://www.koanicsoul.com/blog/reading-faces-the-eyes-are-the-windows-to-the-soul/

      ————

      On a different note, there is one nerve which fires in response to social defeat, loss, misery etc. It is somewhere in the stomach/bowel area. At low levels of activity, it makes you feel “empty inside”. At high levels, it is like being shot, stabbed, or “having your heart ripped out”. I’m currently trying to isolate that nerve (get its anatomical name) and figure out what to do with it. In this day and age, especially for the vulnerable (I’m talking Neanderthal types), we need a fix to turn its action right down, because it’s making empty jaded skeletons of some of the best of us. I found a fix by accident in my “How I Beat Depression — Forever” post, but it was not permanent. I can still turn that nerve off by investigating it but haven’t figured out the immediate “off” switch. Any suggestions for which nerve that may be are welcome.

  2. Diogo says:

    Loved this, very interesting.

    There is something called amigdala ticlking (related to Neil Slade), and finally I could understand why when doing it my posture would become right away “correct” (Contentedness pattern) and with enough continuous pratice time, I would start to feel a literal warmness in my chest.

    Another interesting thing from another guy (it is from a comercial product) was to get into a mind space of pleasure (the objective was to feel has most of the sensation of pleasure in your body has possible), would you say it would amount to the same pathway/vagus nerve activation?

    What about a combination of the pathways of both contentedness and desire, what would you say would be the result of that?

    Regarding the nerve you are looking for, maybe it is related to the Spermatic Plexus (the one that makes you nauseous when you get kicked in the balls)? I have no idea, just throwing mud at the wall.

    Thanks for the article, will donate when I have the possibility, and will definatly get your ebook when it gets out of the oven!

    • Illuminatus says:

      “There is something called amigdala ticlking (related to Neil Slade)”

      Thanks for the tip. I discovered brain tickling myself and we discussed it on the old forum — I called it “stirring” and likened it to stirring porridge inside the brain to turn different bits on. I think it was on the Private Lounge though so won’t be available to anyone. I can’t be bothered to dig it out.

      “Another interesting thing from another guy (it is from a comercial product) was to get into a mind space of pleasure (the objective was to feel has most of the sensation of pleasure in your body has possible), would you say it would amount to the same pathway/vagus nerve activation?”

      It depends what they mean by “pleasure”. There is “contented” pleasure (e.g. being warm in bed, and the contentedness pathway discussed in this post) and then there are other kinds of pleasure, e.g. desirous, rapturous, ecstatic, excited, sexual, orgasmic etc. I would say to truly experience pleasure the vagus nerve is a requirement, but I wouldn’t say “pleasure amounts to the vagus nerve”, no. There will be other processes going on depending on the type of pleasure.

      “What about a combination of the pathways of both contentedness and desire, what would you say would be the result of that?”

      That’s the best mode for socializing, sex etc.

      “Regarding the nerve you are looking for, maybe it is related to the Spermatic Plexus (the one that makes you nauseous when you get kicked in the balls)? I have no idea, just throwing mud at the wall.”

      Thanks, but I think the nerve I’m talking about is concerned with digestion. Lots of emotions began with simple body functions. E.g. if you feel “empty inside”, that suggests to me something connected with the digestive system as its original function. Some people overeat when depressed, others can’t eat at all. So that’s a strong link, I reckon.

      “Thanks for the article, will donate when I have the possibility, and will definatly get your ebook when it gets out of the oven!”

      Thanks a lot! Don’t count on an e-book any time soon. I don’t even know what it would be about. I tend to go nuts and post long things when the moment grabs me here on the blog. It means I get rapid feedback (basically, a quick “hit”). What would you like to see me write an e-book about?

  3. AJM says:

    Do you initiate the REM by “falling down” or otherwise? When I “fall down” I get rapid eye movements. I also get that often when shaking, but I don’t know how to initiate REM only. Now that I’m writing this I reread the section on REM and there you say there is no special trick so I guess I’ll have to keep trying. 🙂

    • Illuminatus says:

      Yes you’ll get REM during the “falling muscles” exercise and during other stages of meditation such as first jhana.

      To get REM at will, roll your eyes back in their sockets and “open your ears” like you do when you yawn, so you can lightly hear the sound of air rushing in them. Thanks, I’ll add this to the guide.

  4. AJM says:

    I’ve now been able to get REM a couple of times. It tends to be less intense compared to “falling down” or shaking. I got REM for a few seconds then it stopped and a relaxation wave passed through me.

  5. AJM says:

    It helps if I unfocus my eyes and move my attention to just below the forehead at the bridge of my nose.

  6. Happy_Hilary says:

    Nice post. It reminds me a bit of alba emoting, which involve training in producing six basic emotional effector patterns, joy, tenderness, anger, fear, sadness, and erotic love (often used by actors).
    https://breathxpress.wordpress.com/alba-emoting/

    Here are some practical descriptions I found for the six emotional states – they put more emphasis on breathing patterns:
    http://onlinepdfcatalog.com/images/pdf/albaemoting.cl1-2_1.jpg
    in inducing those states than in your descriptions.
    I find that inducing joy or erotic love is nice starter for quick relaxation before switching to tender love.

    “In an article co-written by Dr. Susana Bloch, Madeleine
    Lemeignan, and Nancy Aguilera-Torres, the instructions for “respiratory rhythms
    degrees of muscular tension/relaxation, degrees of eye and/or mouth opening and postural attitudes prototypical for each basic emotion” are as follows:

    Anger. Breathe sharply in and out through the nose; keep your lips tightly
    closed and contract the lower jaw; focus your eyes, tensing the lids; put
    tension in the body and incline it slightly forward as if ready to attack.

    Fear. Give sharp in-breaths through the open mouth, ‘holding’ as it were,
    your breath; keep the breathing shallow and irregular; at the same time
    open your eyes wide; tense the body, inclining it slightly backwards, as if
    trying to avoid something.

    Sadness-crying. Inhale in brief saccades through the nose and then exhale
    all the air in one expiratory movement through the open mouth, as in a
    sigh; keep your body relaxed, arms hanging; let your head drop slightly
    and point your gaze downwards.

    Joy-laughter. Inhale sharply through the nose and exhale the air through
    the mouth in rapid saccades; at the same time stretch your lips horizontally
    drawing the corners up and back; keep your eyes semi-closed, the body
    very relaxed, the head loosely hanging backwards.

    Erotic love. Breathe in and out through the open relaxed mouth in a rather
    shallow and fast rhythm; keep the body very relaxed, head tilted
    backwards and to the side, exposing the neck; move your hips very slowly.

    Tenderness. Breathe very evenly through the nose; put up a little smile;
    keep your eyes open with relaxed lids. Slightly tilt your head sideways.
    Keep your body very relaxed. “

  7. G says:

    Is anyone having trouble with the “standing tall” technique? It is supposed to be the easiest one, but for some reason I can’t seem to make it work

  8. PsySeducer says:

    Maybe you have the OCD type of anxiety,if so good posture isn’t enough so you might combine it with a mind based approach.
    Describe how you fail to make it work, give more details… do you relax your back muscles and breathe properly? Don’t expect by standing tall to get rid of social phobia, it only heps with fear,nervousness and body symptoms.
    Use the smile one, is almost efortless and way more efficient.

  1. September 17, 2015

    […] ask for a couple of reasons. The first is that feedback so far on the REM technique in the Basic Anxiety guide has tended towards “This is hard” or “I […]

  2. December 23, 2015

    […] really powerful practice that Edd from Personal Power Meditation taught me is putting the body in a highly positive, relaxed state, and to smile as you do it (which […]

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